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Dr Kaukab Siddique | Editor-in-Chief Safar 24, 1428/ March 14, 2007 #22


Scroll all the way down to photo of crowd mourning African Muslim children from Mali who were killed in a fire in the Bronx, New York.


LATEST WAR NEWS:

AFGHANISTAN: Helmand Province: March 7-13. NATO offensive seems to have failed after Operation Achilles began with 5500 U.S., British, Dutch and Kabul troops. There were only two fire fights and in each a British soldier was killed. Taliban commander Mullah DadAllah said to reporters: Our Faith will win over overwhelming NATO fire power. Chechen and Palestinian mujahideen are with the Taliban in this battle, he said.

March 11. In Kandahar province, Karzai's troops fell into a Taliban ambush and 9 Karzai officers were killed. The Karzai rulers admitted that Helmand province has been in Taliban hands for more than a year.

PAKISTAN: General Musharraf struck at the independence of the Judiciary by arresting and suspending Iftikhar Choudhary, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Lawyers are demonstrating in major Pak. cities. The Chief Justice had stopped Hindu influence in Punjab by banning kite flying on Basant. He was getting ready to rule on the hundreds of people the Mush regime has "disappeared" or given to U.S. He also had to rule on Mush's legitimacy to stand for "re-election."

In North Waziristan Pak troops thwarted an Islamist attack by using helicopter gunships. Three Islamic fighters were killed while one Pakistani officer was killed and two wounded. In an audacious attack, Islamic fighters hit military HQ in Miramshah with mortar fire. During the night of March 10-11, the entire town of Bannu was awakened by three powerful rocket fire explosions sent in by Islamists. [It's a military town.]

The U.S. deported 72 PAKISTANIS on March 6. They were dropped at Rawalpindi airport and given $100 each. One of them, Gul Maula, who had been in the U.S. for 32 years, left behind a business worth millions. Another Pakistani, Shaikh Zahorr, who had been in the U.S. for 18 years, was kept in a dirty prison cell fr 5 months before being deported.

IRAQ: Heavy fighting continued in March. In February, 80 U.S. troops were killed. Another 31 have been killed in March bringing the total to 1395. A Republican Congressman who returned from Iraq on March 12 said that Shi'ite troops have joined hands with the U.S. in Fallujah and Ramadi along with some Iraqi Sunnis.
[The resistance is 80% Sunni, 20% Al-Qaidah from other countries, include Sudan, U.S. sources now admit.]


THIS IS WHERE MASAUD KHAN HAS BEEN SENT: Innocent Pakistani-American

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=07/02/27/1454224

U.S. Opens New Prison To Hold Mostly Arab Muslims
The Washington Post is reporting the Justice Department has quietly opened a new prison unit in Terre Haute, Indiana designed to hold mostly Arab Muslim prisoners. The jail operates under special rules restricting the ability of prisoners to communicate with the outside world. All telephone calls and mail are monitored, the number of phone calls are limited and visits are restricted to a total of four hours per month. All prison conversations must be conducted in English unless otherwise negotiated. The Iraqi-born doctor Rafil Dhafir from upstate New York is among the prisoners being held. He is serving a 22-year sentence for violating the Iraqi sanctions by sending aid to Iraq through his charity Help the Needy. Five members of the so-called "Lackawanna Six" are also being held in the Indiana prison. Only two non-Muslims are being held at the jail.


SIRAJ WAHHAJ: ISNA's MAN who Helped Put Shaikh Omar 'Abdel Rahman in Prison

On his "Mana Matters" Email He Does not Tell Readers that he is ISNA's Central Man

FROM ISNA's WEB SITE:

Imam Siraj Wahhaj, a long standing member of ISNA, emphasized that Islam's mission to humanity "is to call to the path of God, with 'wisdom and beautiful preaching'."


ONCE AGAIN NEW TREND's ANALYSIS WAS CORRECT: U.S., Iran, Syria, met in BAGHDAD!

While just about everyone was saying attack on Iran is Imminent, NT saw US-Iran Intersection

Tehran Times. March 11

Saturday's one-day conference was also seen as an ice breaker for the United States and Iran after nearly 28-years of diplomatic estrangement.

Khalilzad said he exchanged views with Iranian delegates "directly and in the presence of others" at the gathering.

He declined to give details of the contacts Ś calling them only "constructive and businesslike and problem-solving".

The chief Iranian envoy, Abbas Araghchi, said he restated his country's demands for a clear timetable for the withdrawal of U.S.-led forces, which he insisted have made Iraq a magnet for extremists from across the Muslim world.

"Violence in Iraq is good for no country in the region," said Araghchi, deputy foreign minister for legal and international affairs, at a post-meeting news conference.


From Dr. Anwarul Haque, Islamabad, Pakistan

16th March:
Rachel Corrie Day

Please read her letters below and see the courage of this great woman who sacrificed her life in defending Palestinians against Israeli and Global Terrorism.

Please write articles and poems, make Dua and forward this message to your friends, relatives and other honest and truthful persons. Thanks...... ....

Rachel's war

This weekend 23-year-old American peace activist Rachel Corrie was crushed to death by a bulldozer as she tried to prevent the Israeli army destroying homes in the Gaza Strip. In a remarkable series of emails to her family, she explained why she was risking her life.

February 7 2003

Hi friends and family, and others,

I have been in Palestine for two weeks and one hour now, and I still have very few words to describe what I see. It is most difficult for me to think about what's going on here when I sit down to write back to the United States. Something about the virtual portal into luxury. I don't know if many of the children here have ever existed without tank-shell holes in their walls and the towers of an occupying army surveying them constantly from the near horizons. I think, although I'm not entirely sure, that even the smallest of these children understand that life is not like this everywhere. An eight-year-old was shot and killed by an Israeli tank two days before I got here, and many of the children murmur his name to me - Ali - or point at the posters of him on the walls. The children also love to get me to practice my limited Arabic by asking me, "Kaif Sharon?" "Kaif Bush?" and they laugh when I say, "Bush Majnoon", "Sharon Majnoon" back in my limited arabic. (How is Sharon ? How is Bush? Bush is crazy. Sharon is crazy.) Of course this isn't quite what I believe, and some of the adults who have the English correct me: "Bush mish Majnoon" ... Bush is a businessman. Today I tried to learn to say, "Bush is a tool", but I don't think it translated quite right. But anyway, there are eight-year-olds here much more aware of the workings of the global power structure than I was just a few years ago.

Nevertheless, no amount of reading, attendance at conferences, documentary viewing and word of mouth could have prepared me for the reality of the situation here. You just can't imagine it unless you see it - and even then you are always well aware that your experience of it is not at all the reality: what with the difficulties the Israeli army would face if they shot an unarmed US citizen, and with the fact that I have money to buy water when the army destroys wells, and the fact, of course, that I have the option of leaving. Nobody in my family has been shot, driving in their car, by a rocket launcher from a tower at the end of a major street in my hometown. I have a home. I am allowed to go see the ocean. When I leave for school or work I can be relatively certain that there will not be a heavily armed soldier waiting halfway between Mud Bay and downtown Olympia at a checkpoint with the power to decide whether I can go about my business, and whether I can get home again when I'm done. As an afterthought to all this rambling, I am in Rafah: a city of about 140,000 people, approximately 60% of whom are refugees - many of whom are twice or three times refugees. Today, as I walked on top of the rubble where homes once stood, Egyptian soldiers called to me from the other side of the border, "Go! Go!" because a tank was coming. And then waving and "What's your name?". Something disturbing about this friendly curiosity. It reminded me of how much, to some degree, we are all kids curious about other kids. Egyptian kids shouting at strange women wandering into the path of tanks. Palestinian kids shot from the tanks when they peak out from behind walls to see what's going on. International kids standing in front of tanks with banners. Israeli kids in the tanks anonymously - occasionally shouting and also occasionally waving - many forced to be here, many just aggressive - shooting into the houses as we wander away.

I've been having trouble accessing news about the outside world here, but I hear an escalation of war on Iraq is inevitable. There is a great deal of concern here about the "reoccupation of Gaza ". Gaza is reoccupied every day to various extents but I think the fear is that the tanks will enter all the streets and remain here instead of entering some of the streets and then withdrawing after some hours or days to observe and shoot from the edges of the communities. If people aren't already thinking about the consequences of this war for the people of the entire region then I hope you will start.

My love to everyone. My love to my mom. My love to smooch. My love to fg and barnhair and sesamees and Lincoln School. My love to Olympia.

Rachel

February 20 2003

Mama,

Now the Israeli army has actually dug up the road to Gaza , and both of the major checkpoints are closed. This means that Palestinians who want to go and register for their next quarter at university can't. People can't get to their jobs and those who are trapped on the other side can't get home; and internationals, who have a meeting tomorrow in the West Bank , won't make it. We could probably make it through if we made serious use of our international white person privilege, but that would also mean some risk of arrest and deportation, even though none of us has done anything illegal.

The Gaza Strip is divided in thirds now. There is some talk about the "reoccupation of Gaza ", but I seriously doubt this will happen, because I think it would be a geopolitically stupid move for Israel right now. I think the more likely thing is an increase in smaller below-the-international-outcry-radar incursions and possibly the oft-hinted "population transfer".

I am staying put in Rafah for now, no plans to head north. I still feel like I'm relatively safe and think that my most likely risk in case of a larger-scale incursion is arrest. A move to reoccupy Gaza would generate a much larger outcry than Sharon 's assassination- during-peace- negotiations/ land grab strategy, which is working very well now to create settlements all over, slowly but surely eliminating any meaningful possibility for Palestinian self-determination. Know that I have a lot of very nice Palestinians looking after me. I have a small flu bug, and got some very nice lemony drinks to cure me. Also, the woman who keeps the key for the well where we still sleep keeps asking me about you. She doesn't speak a bit of English, but she asks about my mom pretty frequently - wants to make sure I'm calling you.

Love to you and Dad and Sarah and Chris and everybody.

Rachel

February 27 2003

(To her mother)

Love you. Really miss you. I have bad nightmares about tanks and bulldozers outside our house and you and me inside. Sometimes the adrenaline acts as an anesthetic for weeks and then in the evening or at night it just hits me again - a little bit of the reality of the situation. I am really scared for the people here. Yesterday, I watched a father lead his two tiny children, holding his hands, out into the sight of tanks and a sniper tower and bulldozers and Jeeps because he thought his house was going to be exploded. Jenny and I stayed in the house with several women and two small babies. It was our mistake in translation that caused him to think it was his house that was being exploded. In fact, the Israeli army was in the process of detonating an explosive in the ground nearby - one that appears to have been planted by Palestinian resistance.

This is in the area where Sunday about 150 men were rounded up and contained outside the settlement with gunfire over their heads and around them, while tanks and bulldozers destroyed 25 greenhouses - the livelihoods for 300 people. The explosive was right in front of the greenhouses - right in the point of entry for tanks that might come back again. I was terrified to think that this man felt it was less of a risk to walk out in view of the tanks with his kids than to stay in his house. I was really scared that they were all going to be shot and I tried to stand between them and the tank. This happens every day, but just this father walking out with his two little kids just looking very sad, just happened to get my attention more at this particular moment, probably because I felt it was our translation problems that made him leave.

I thought a lot about what you said on the phone about Palestinian violence not helping the situation. Sixty thousand workers from Rafah worked in Israel two years ago. Now only 600 can go to Israel for jobs. Of these 600, many have moved, because the three checkpoints between here and Ashkelon (the closest city in Israel ) make what used to be a 40-minute drive, now a 12-hour or impassible journey. In addition, what Rafah identified in 1999 as sources of economic growth are all completely destroyed - the Gaza international airport (runways demolished, totally closed); the border for trade with Egypt (now with a giant Israeli sniper tower in the middle of the crossing); access to the ocean (completely cut off in the last two years by a checkpoint and the Gush Katif settlement). The count of homes destroyed in Rafah since the beginning of this intifada is up around 600, by and large people with no connection to the resistance but who happen to live along the border. I think it is maybe official now that Rafah is the poorest place in the world. There used to be a middle class here - recently. We also get reports that in the past, Gazan flower shipments to Europe were delayed for two weeks at the Erez crossing for security inspections. You can imagine the value of two-week-old cut flowers in the European market, so that market dried up. And then the bulldozers come and take out people's vegetable farms and gardens. What is left for people? Tell me if you can think of anything. I can't.

If any of us had our lives and welfare completely strangled, lived with children in a shrinking place where we knew, because of previous experience, that soldiers and tanks and bulldozers could come for us at any moment and destroy all the greenhouses that we had been cultivating for however long, and did this while some of us were beaten and held captive with 149 other people for several hours - do you think we might try to use somewhat violent means to protect whatever fragments remained? I think about this especially when I see orchards and greenhouses and fruit trees destroyed - just years of care and cultivation. I think about you and how long it takes to make things grow and what a labour of love it is. I really think, in a similar situation, most people would defend themselves as best they could. I think Uncle Craig would. I think probably Grandma would. I think I would.

You asked me about non-violent resistance.

When that explosive detonated yesterday it broke all the windows in the family's house. I was in the process of being served tea and playing with the two small babies. I'm having a hard time right now. Just feel sick to my stomach a lot from being doted on all the time, very sweetly, by people who are facing doom. I know that from the United States , it all sounds like hyperbole. Honestly, a lot of the time the sheer kindness of the people here, coupled with the overwhelming evidence of the wilful destruction of their lives, makes it seem unreal to me. I really can't believe that something like this can happen in the world without a bigger outcry about it. It really hurts me, again, like it has hurt me in the past, to witness how awful we can allow the world to be. I felt after talking to you that maybe you didn't completely believe me. I think it's actually good if you don't, because I do believe pretty much above all else in the importance of independent critical thinking. And I also realise that with you I'm much less careful than usual about trying to source every assertion that I make. A lot of the reason for that is I know that you actually do go and do your own research. But it makes me worry about the job I'm doing. All of the situation that I tried to enumerate above - and a lot of other things - constitutes a somewhat gradual - often hidden, but nevertheless massive - removal and destruction of the ability of a particular group of people to survive. This is what I am seeing here. The assassinations, rocket attacks and shooting of children are atrocities - but in focusing on them I'm terrified of missing their context. The vast majority of people here - even if they had the economic means to escape, even if they actually wanted to give up resisting on their land and just leave (which appears to be maybe the less nefarious of Sharon's possible goals), can't leave. Because they can't even get into Israel to apply for visas, and because their destination countries won't let them in (both our country and Arab countries). So I think when all means of survival is cut off in a pen (Gaza) which people can't get out of, I think that qualifies as genocide. Even if they could get out, I think it would still qualify as genocide. Maybe you could look up the definition of genocide according to international law. I don't remember it right now. I'm going to get better at illustrating this, hopefully. I don't like to use those charged words. I think you know this about me. I really value words. I really try to illustrate and let people draw their own conclusions.

Anyway, I'm rambling. Just want to write to my Mom and tell her that I'm witnessing this chronic, insidious genocide and I'm really scared, and questioning my fundamental belief in the goodness of human nature. This has to stop. I think it is a good idea for us all to drop everything and devote our lives to making this stop. I don't think it's an extremist thing to do anymore. I still really want to dance around to Pat Benatar and have boyfriends and make comics for my coworkers. But I also want this to stop. Disbelief and horror is what I feel. Disappointment. I am disappointed that this is the base reality of our world and that we, in fact, participate in it. This is not at all what I asked for when I came into this world. This is not at all what the people here asked for when they came into this world. This is not the world you and Dad wanted me to come into when you decided to have me. This is not what I meant when I looked at Capital Lake and said: "This is the wide world and I'm coming to it." I did not mean that I was coming into a world where I could live a comfortable life and possibly, with no effort at all, exist in complete unawareness of my participation in genocide. More big explosions somewhere in the distance outside.

When I come back from Palestine , I probably will have nightmares and constantly feel guilty for not being here, but I can channel that into more work. Coming here is one of the better things I've ever done. So when I sound crazy, or if the Israeli military should break with their racist tendency not to injure white people, please pin the reason squarely on the fact that I am in the midst of a genocide which I am also indirectly supporting, and for which my government is largely responsible.

I love you and Dad. Sorry for the diatribe. OK, some strange men next to me just gave me some peas, so I need to eat and thank them.

Rachel

February 28 2003

(To her mother)

Thanks, Mom, for your response to my email. It really helps me to get word from you, and from other people who care about me.

After I wrote to you I went incommunicado from the affinity group for about 10 hours which I spent with a family on the front line in Hi Salam - who fixed me dinner - and have cable TV. The two front rooms of their house are unusable because gunshots have been fired through the walls, so the whole family - three kids and two parents - sleep in the parent's bedroom. I sleep on the floor next to the youngest daughter, Iman, and we all shared blankets. I helped the son with his English homework a little, and we all watched Pet Cemetery, which is a horrifying movie. I think they all thought it was pretty funny how much trouble I had watching it. Friday is the holiday, and when I woke up they were watching Gummy Bears dubbed into Arabic. So I ate breakfast with them and sat there for a while and just enjoyed being in this big puddle of blankets with this family watching what for me seemed like Saturday morning cartoons. Then I walked some way to B'razil, which is where Nidal and Mansur and Grandmother and Rafat and all the rest of the big family that has really wholeheartedly adopted me live. (The other day, by the way, Grandmother gave me a pantomimed lecture in Arabic that involved a lot of blowing and pointing to her black shawl. I got Nidal to tell her that my mother would appreciate knowing that someone here was giving me a lecture about smoking turning my lungs black.) I met their sister-in-law, who is visiting from Nusserat camp, and played with her small baby.

Nidal's English gets better every day. He's the one who calls me, "My sister". He started teaching Grandmother how to say, "Hello. How are you?" In English. You can always hear the tanks and bulldozers passing by, but all of these people are genuinely cheerful with each other, and with me. When I am with Palestinian friends I tend to be somewhat less horrified than when I am trying to act in a role of human rights observer, documenter, or direct-action resister. They are a good example of how to be in it for the long haul. I know that the situation gets to them - and may ultimately get them - on all kinds of levels, but I am nevertheless amazed at their strength in being able to defend such a large degree of their humanity - laughter, generosity, family-time - against the incredible horror occurring in their lives and against the constant presence of death. I felt much better after this morning. I spent a lot of time writing about the disappointment of discovering, somewhat first-hand, the degree of evil of which we are still capable. I should at least mention that I am also discovering a degree of strength and of basic ability for humans to remain human in the direst of circumstances - which I also haven't seen before. I think the word is dignity. I wish you could meet these people. Maybe, hopefully, someday you will.

In Memoriam
~ Rachel Corrie ~
1979 - 2003

:::ACTION ALERT FROM RACHEL'S PARENTS:::

Dear Friends,

On the third anniversary of Rachel's killing in Gaza, here are three things that we urge you to consider doing today, or as soon as possible:

1) From New York:
"The "Rachel's Words" initiative is made up of a broad spectrum of groups and individuals who believe that Rachel's words and her message of human rights and justice should be heard. We hope that Rachel's Words will open the door for other equally important and silenced voices. We resist the pervasive climate of fear and challenge to free speech that is increasingly prevalent in our society. Rachel wrote about issues that concern us all. People must have the opportunity to hear her message and decide for themselves what they think. Nobody's agenda should stand in the way of that."

To endorse this initiative, please go to this link--and to the "About" or "Endorsement" headings http://www.rachelswords.org/ about

If you, your family, or your group are spending any time today or in upcoming days returning to Rachel's e-mails and words, please list this under "Actions" at http://rachelswords.org/actions

2) The U.S. Campaign to End the Israeli Occupation has called for a day of action today, March 16th. Please go to their website to learn about their Caterpillar campaign and more that you can do: http://endtheoccupation.org/article.php?id=1190

3) While the U.S. Government is on record stating that the report of the Israeli military investigation into Rachel's killing did not meet the standard of "thorough, credible, or transparent, " the U.S. has taken no steps to investigate this killing of an American citizen by a foreign military. Our family's often frustrating efforts to demand accountability from both the U.S. and Israeli governments continue. This week, family members are in Washington DC meeting with members of Congress. Please help us. Pick up the telephone and call your representative and Senators in the U.S. Congress and tell them that more must be done and that after three years it is an outrage that members of the Corrie family must still walk the halls of Congress seeking support simply to learn the truth. If you live in Washington State, please make a special call to Senator Murray's office noting that for three years she and her staff have drug their feet and have refused to take any leadership whatsoever in this matter-leadership that other members of Congress tell us they look to a senior senator to provide when a citizen of their state is so gravely impacted.

Thank you for your continuing care and support.
Cindy and Craig Corrie.

:::ACTION ALERT FROM TRUE MUSLIMS ACROSS THE WORLD

As Muslims we stand for truth, absolute truth and noting but truth. We are for justice, honesty, peace and humanity. Islam is diagonally opposite to terrorism. All terrorism of all sorts is committed by the worst enemies of Islam and through their jaundiced media, they ascribe to these to Muslims and Islam. Yesterday Abraham (Ibrahim) fought against the tyrants, Moses (Moosa) fought against Pharaoh and Jesus (Issa) fought against the economic terrorism of then Zionists. The fight between Islam and terrorism is from ever to forever till the day of Judgment! Rachel Corrie did what a Muslim is supposed to do. We salute her and dedicate 16th March as Rachel Corrie Day and 16th September as Shatilla and Sabra Day when over 3000 un-armed women were put to death by Sharon . We urge all Muslims and all those who stand for justice and truth to observe these days by writing about these incidences, holding seminars and praying for the departed souls and giving the lesson of truth, courage and justice to all human beings. We as Muslims must enlighten the world through the light of Qur'an (The final and ever protected edition in its original language of all divine books) and model of the last and the final true messenger of Allah Ta'lah. Muhammad (PBUH). Through these we will be able to remove the darkness of ignorance, injustice, terrorism and greed.

Your brother in Islam

Anwar Ul Haque


An Evening of Halal Fun--UmmahSavers Strikes Again!
By Hajure Fontaine (with Tazkiya Smith)

March 2 marked yet another successful and fun-filled event hosted by the UmmahSavers, an independent Muslim youth group, based in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. The event took place at Bailey's Crossroads, VA at Ultrazone. The playing area, or arena, was illuminated by black lights and kept dark, so that everything around a player glowed, including his or her clothes.

As brothers and sisters arrived, they were briefed on the rules of the game: each participant could either defend her base from the other teams, or go on the offensive, searching the twist and turns of the large two-story game area for opponents to blast. Then, the participants formed squads. Each squad tried to score as many points as possible. At the end of each round, the winner was announced.

It was a nice turn out, with attendees ranging in age from 7 to 32, including many who traveled all the way from Baltimore to support the event. Bringing the Muslim community of all ages together to interact, socialize, and simply share in a healthy, interactive experience was truly a blessing. Attendees said they had a great time.

The UmmahSavers' mission is to create an environment conducive to improving relations between Muslim youth from various communities. Efforts to involve and engage our community with each other in a relaxed social setting are rare. The UmmahSavers aim to host bi-monthly events to keep people in contact; the organization plans to increase the frequency of events in the near term.

Previous activities hosted by the UmmahSavers include: several bowling events, white water rafting, billiards, and game nights. The UmmahSavers plan to work within the community, staffing soup kitchens and helping the needy, via an organization called Operation Giveback.

For further information or to donate to UmmahSavers activities for Muslim youth, please contact:

ummahsavers@yahoo.com
(703) 955-49829

or see our website:
http://myspace.com/ummahsavers

2007-03-15 Thu 15:30:04 cst
NewTrendMag.org